Call for Papers: HCI and the Body: Reimagining Women’s Health

Call for Papers


HCI and the Body: Reimagining Women’s Health

A Special Issue of ACM Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction (ToCHI)

Deadline for Abstract Submissions: April 5th, 2019

In the HCI community we have seen an increasing exploration of technology in relation to the female body and women’s health. Much of this work had explored the role that technology can play in supporting transitions to, and experiences of motherhood. Such a focus reflects the wider approach of commercial technologies to the female body – that related to reproductive health. In the last five years research focus in relation to women’s health has broadened, entering into more intimate, taboo, and politically charged topics. This has included the design and evaluation of tools for enabling intimate anatomical knowledge, through to explorations of digital approaches to advocating for changes in policy relating to women’s health issues (from topics such as breastfeeding, parental leave through to abortion rights). These advances in the multiple experiences, voices and concerns of the female body and women’s health not only trouble the kinds of methods we have available for doing design and for evaluating our design work, but also define and redefine the limits of the technologies and interactions we create. So much of women’s health involves concern about parts of the body and topics which are normally highly personal, off-limits. The placement and uses of digital materials and technologies may be orientated or inserted in relation to the body in ways which the HCI community has rarely explored. Questions remain about how we as a community can best approach the body and women’s health in ways which are appropriate, inclusive, while also contributing to the improvement of women’s health experiences at a global level. We ask also how such new possibilities can be deployed, the risks of these deployments, as well as the means by which these interactions can be evaluated not just at an individual level, but also at the socio-cultural and political levels which are widely understood as constructing and limiting women’s health experiences.

Information for Contributors

This special issue aims to provide an inclusive perspective, acknowledging that biology alone does not dictate gender, and that the female experience is more than menstruation, pregnancy and motherhood. We wish to highlight the ways in which the digital intersects with the female experience, roadmap opportunities for digital technologies within women’s health, as well as provide critical and speculative perspectives on what technology means and could mean within this context.

Articles might contribute to this special issue in the following ways:

  • Scoping reviews and evaluations of existing women’s health technologies (including for example the self-sampling for HPV, menstrual tracking applications, technologies for sexual wellbeing, menopause awareness and management, etc.)
  • Ethnographies and/or interaction criticism that unpack women’s health experiences and digital re-presentations of the female body
  • Theoretical revisitations of the relationships between the body and digital technologies scoped to women’s health
  • Applications and designs (including critical and speculative) which respond to a full spectrum of women’s health experiences
  • Activism, advocacy and/or more general politics associated with worldwide access and experiences of women’s health
  • Design methods and processes which engage with, respond to, and reimagine the body in women’s health

We will use a standard journal review process for this special issue, with two rounds of reviews and revisions. Authors are encouraged to submit a short abstract (300-500 words) and a tentative title prior to the full paper submission to be reviewed by the special issue editors. In consultation with the journal managing editor, we will select a list of qualified reviewers for the special issue.

Further information, including TOCHI submission procedures and advice on formatting and preparing your manuscript, can be found at: http://www.acm.org/tochi/

Manuscripts are actually submitted via the ACM online manuscript system at:
http://acm.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi/

Deadline for Abstract Submissions: April 5th, 2019

To discuss a possible contribution, please contact the special issue editors at HCIhealth-editors@acm.org.

Special Issue Editors:


Madeline Balaam (KTH Royal Institute of Technology)
Shaowen Bardzell (Indiana University)
Lone Koefoed Hansen (University of Aarhus)
Teresa Almeida (IT University of Copenhagen).

Schedule and Plan for Special Issue


We will use a standard journal review process for this special issue, with two rounds of reviews and revisions. Authors are encouraged to submit a short abstract (300-500 words) and a tentative title prior to the full paper submission to be reviewed by the special issue editors. In consultation with the journal managing editor, we will select a list of qualified reviewers for the special issue.

The tentative reviewing timeline is as follows:

Abstract submission (300-500 words) deadline: April 5th, 2019
Feedback on abstract to authors (incl. Quick Reject): April 26th, 2019

For papers that pass the first round of review will be invited to submit a full paper, with the following tentative schedule:
Full paper submission deadline: June 14th, 2019
First-round reviews to authors: August 9th 2019
First-round revision deadline: Oct 11th 2019

2nd-round reviews to authors: Nov 8th 2019
Authors work on camera-ready copies and prepare for final submissions: By Nov 29th 2019

Publication is currently scheduled for March 2020.

By |February 13th, 2019|Categories: Call for Papers, Special Issues, Uncategorized||0 Comments

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Human-Building Interaction

 

Call for Papers

Human-Building Interaction

A Special Issue of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ACM TOCHI)

Deadline for Submissions: (be sure to see also our author’s instructions)

  • December 8, 2017: Informal submission of abstract to special issue editors at HBI-TOCHI@unifr.ch.

Submission of an abstract is not required, but very strongly recommended for prospective special issue authors.

 

Information for Contributors

We seek original contributions for a new Special Issue of TOCHI on Human-Building Interaction.

Built environments increasingly incorporate interactivity and context-aware automation. Human-Building Interaction (HBI), as an emerging research field, seeks to develop an HCI lens to the vision of our interactive experiences with built environments.

A special issue of TOCHI on Human-Building Interaction invites research contributions that examine the engagement of HCI in the evolution of buildings and urban spaces.

In particular, we solicit articles that pursue the new coordinates that HCI should take into account when shifting attention and scale from “artefact” to “environment.” For example, the investigations on the occupant comfort across multiple dimensions (e.g., thermal, visual, acoustic, respiratory), the discussions of the interplay between user agency and building automation, the reflections on the immersive and durable user experience design, and so forth.

We seek contributions that address these and similar topics that embody the complexity of human’s individual and collective experiences with and within the built environment. The invited topics include technological innovations, ethnographic studies, as well as conceptual and framing contributions.

Between the lofty and mundane discourses of interactive architecture and connected products lies considerable space for grounded research and reflective discussion.

This special issue invites attempts to capture, share, and expand what is already known, what is contested, and what are opportunities for a common scientific grounding for prospective dialogues and discourses in the area of Human-Building Interaction. It will serve both as a unifying stage for the existing voices that are centrally and peripherally working on HBI, and a platform for the research area to move forward.

 

The HBI special issue is interested in questions including (but not limited to) the following:

  • How can HBI designers reconcile the complexity of human decisions with the efficiency that the automation systems promise? What services do we expect the building to provide seamlessly, and where do we want to retain the manipulation control, and through what interaction modalities?
  • What are the UX design challenges in creating buildings that can adapt to their occupants’ contextualized needs and preferences?
  • Surveillance is increasingly common to provide security. How does the need for surveillance interplay with the privacy concerns which are especially elevated in inhabited environments?
  • What can we learn from the comfort literature in the scholarly domain of architecture, and how can an HCI perspective complement and (possibly) correct the current comfort discourses?
  • In what ways can built environments support and take advantage of social and cultural diversity?
  • Are architecture and interaction design methods and processes compatible? Concretely, how can a team of interaction designers bring their tools to an architectural project?

Contact

Please direct inquiries regarding the special issue to HBI-TOCHI@unifr.ch.

 

Special Issue Editors:

  • Hamed Alavi (University of Fribourg and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL))
  • Elizabeth Churchill (Google, Mountain View)
  • Mikael Wiberg (Umea University)
  • Denis Lalanne (University of Fribourg)
  • Peter Dalsgaard (Aarhus University)
  • Ava Fatah gen Schieck (UCL, Bartlett School of Architecture)
  • Yvonne Rodgers (University College London & TOCHI Editorial Board)

Schedule and Submission Details

Pre-Submission Abstract Due: Dec 8, 2017 (email to HBI-TOCHI@unifr.ch).
Full Manuscript Submission deadline: Jan 12, 2018 (must submit to: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi).

The tentative reviewing timeline is as follows:

  • Reviews Due: March 30, 2018
  • First-round notifications to authors: April 15, 2018
  • First-round revisions due: June 15, 2018

Papers that pass the first round of reviewing will enter revisions and a second round of consideration:

  • Second-round reviews due: August 15, 2018
  • Second-round (final) author notifications: Sept 1, 2018
  • Final revisions Due: Oct 10, 2018

Special Issue Published: February 2019

 

All contributions will be rigorously peer reviewed to the usual exacting standards of TOCHI. Further information, including TOCHI submission procedures and advice on formatting and preparing manuscripts, can be found at: http://tochi.acm.org/authors/.

Manuscripts are submitted via the ACM online manuscript system at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi.

Please note that TOCHI remains open to regular submissions, as well, throughout the special issue call.

Final Reminder: Re-imagining Participatory Design special issue deadline soon (Jan 2017!)

Our special issue on Re-imagining Participatory Design deadline is coming up very soon (we recommend sending your abstract to the special issue editors by Jan. 5 — see details at the link below.)

In case this opportunity has not yet caught your attention, here’s a little blurb for the special issue:

 

In recent years it seems Participatory Design has become synonymous with a more neutral form of ‘user-centered’ design, often merely aimed at a sort of token involvement of users in design, but in its deep roots—and hopefully in its re-imagined future to come—Participatory Design empowered intervention upon situations of conflict through developing more democratic processes.

Rather than a sort of corporate memo that has lost its verve by being xerox-copied one time too many in service of bland and generalized “information technology” needs, this Re-imagining encourages a return to Participatory Design’s vibrant roots in giving voice to oft-marginalized and under-represented classes of users.

With this perspective in mind, TOCHI extends an invitation for the community to think boldly about the future of participatory design.

To get involved, check out:

http://tochi.acm.org/re-imagining-participatory-design/

And we hope to see your submission in January 2017.

 

By |December 13th, 2016|Categories: 2017, Call for Papers, Special Issues|Tags: |0 Comments

Updated Call-for-Papers: Re-imagining Participatory Design

[This special issue call is now closed to new submissions.]

 Schedule and Submission Details

Pre-Submission Abstract Due: Sept 15, 2016  Jan 5, 2017 (email to reimaginingpd@gmail.com)
Full Manuscript Submission deadline: Oct 05, 2016  Jan 23, 2017 (must submit to: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi).

Author Notification (first round): Jan 10, 2017  April 27, 2017
Revisions due: March 1, 2017  June 27, 2017
Author Notification (second round):  May 10, 2017  Sept 20, 2017
Final revisions due: Aug 10, 2017  Oct 15, 2017
Special Issue Published: Late 2017 (estimated)  January 2018 (Vol 25, Issue 1)

 

Please refer to the full text of the call for details on submitting to this special issue.

Call for Papers: Re-imagining Participatory Design

A Special Issue of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ACM TOCHI)

Update! Due to the overlap with the CHI 2017 conference submissions timeline — as well as a late-breaking shift in our plans for our 2017 issues — we have decided to push this special issue out a little bit.

Submissions will now be due in Jan 2017 per the updated timeline below.

Deadline for Submissions (see author’s instructions):

 

We seek original contributions for a Special Issue of TOCHI on Reimagining Participatory Design (PD).

In particular, we seek research contributions that address the potentials and failures of participatory design in pursuing its democratizing project in emerging Information Technology (IT) domains. We solicit research papers that open up new horizons in Participatory Design for the field, or critically examine successes and failures of the past. Conceptual, methodological, and empirical papers are welcome.

When participatory design related to information technology in the workplace emerged in the 1970s, it sought to rebalance power and agency among managers and workers. Today’s Information Technology domains are more heterogeneous and less defined, and in many new contexts, it is difficult to bring sociotechnical conflicts into the open, whereby stakeholders are empowered to participate. As a result, power and agency seems to have gravitated away from end users and other stakeholders to government and multinational agencies.

Meanwhile, participatory design often seems to have become synonymous with a more neutral form of ‘user-centered’ design, concentrating on more local issues of usability and user satisfaction.

This is in contrast to earlier work in the field where Participatory Design not only sought to incorporate users in design, but also to intervene upon situations of conflict through developing more democratic processes.

This special issue extends an invitation to think boldly about the future of participatory design.

As guidance for possible topics for special issue contributions, we ask questions including (but not limited to) the following:

  • How are Information Technology systems today embedded in, or embodying, political conflicts such that Participatory Design could make a positive contribution?
  • What is (or should be) the role of Participatory Design in new computing contexts, including makers, ubiquitous computing, robotics, Internet of Things, cultural and creative industries, and other emerging trends?
  • How do we make sense of, and enact change in global coordination protocols that embody problematic power relations and scant worker protection? (e.g., crowdsourcing models such as Amazon Mechanical Turk.)
  • In what ways has participatory design failed to give voice to the marginal? How has it ignored, coopted, homogenized marginal voices? How might it do better?
  • How does, should, or could Participatory Design intersect with critical design, speculative design, feminist HCI, action research, design fictions, HCI for peace, and so forth?
  • How can Participatory Design help designers move from helping people do what they are already doing towards helping them make better decisions in future projects?

 

 

Deadline

Abstracts due Sept 15, 2016 Jan 5, 2017. We strongly recommend informal submission of abstracts to the special issue editors at reimaginingpd@gmail.com.

Final manuscripts are due Oct 05, 2016 Jan 23, 2017, but earlier submissions are encouraged.

Contact

Please direct inquiries regarding the special issue to reimaginingpd@gmail.com.

 

Special Issue Editors:

  • Liam Bannon (University of Limerick and Aarhus University)
  • Jeffrey Bardzell (Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing)
  • Susanne Bødker (Aarhus University & Associate Editor, TOCHI)

 

Schedule and Submission Details

Pre-Submission Abstract Due: Sept 15, 2016  Jan 5, 2017 (email to reimaginingpd@gmail.com)
Full Manuscript Submission deadline: Oct 05, 2016  Jan 23, 2017 (must submit to: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi).

Author Notification (first round): Jan 10, 2017  April 27, 2017
Revisions due: March 1, 2017  June 27, 2017
Author Notification (second round):  May 10, 2017  Sept 20, 2017
Final revisions due: Aug 10, 2017  Oct 15, 2017
Special Issue Published: Late 2017 (estimated)  January 2018 (Vol 25, Issue 1)

 

 

All contributions will be rigorously peer reviewed to the usual exacting standards of TOCHI. Further information, including TOCHI submission procedures and advice on formatting and preparing manuscripts, can be found at: http://tochi.acm.org/authors/.

Manuscripts are submitted via the ACM online manuscript system at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi.

This is an abridged version of the call for publicity purposes. See http://tochi.acm.org/re-imagining-participatory-design/ for full details.

Please note that TOCHI remains open to regular submissions, as well, throughout the special issue call.

Updated Timeline for Special Issue on “End User Development for the Internet of Things”

Please note that our deadline for the TOCHI Special Issue on End User Development for the Internet of Things has changed.

Updated Timeline:

We have adjusted the deadline for this special issue slightly, with a new submissions deadline of April 05, 2016.

But to assist with our planning, please email us your title and abstract (500 words maximum) detailing your planned contribution by March 22, 2016.

Abstracts will not be reviewed and authors are free to further revise them in the final full-manuscript submission. The abstract deadline will not be strictly enforced but is strongly encouraged so that we can marshal appropriate editorial and reviewing resources.

So to recap, the dates are:

The April 05, 2016 due date is a hard deadline and will not be changed again. So please do hit the deadline if you want your contribution to be considered for this exciting special issue.

TOCHI Call for Papers, 2016

I must admit, I find long lists of research topics to be violently dull.

And yet, as your friend and humble narrator (not to mention putative Editor-in-Chief), one of the very first tasks that confronted me was to issue a spiffy new Call for Papers for TOCHI.

So rather than subjecting you to a gradual sanding-down of your own existence as your eyes grate across an enumeration of bullet-pointed buzzwords, what I instead set out to convey was the essence of what gives the journal its vigor.

And announce some cool new initiatives to boot.

Give it a gander, and I hope that you will respond in kind by submitting your latest and greatest work.

Or by pausing to reflect on a research agenda that you may have been stewing on for years, and serving up that accumulated wisdom as a milestone contribution.

And I will reward any and all upstanding individuals who post our professionally-designed TOCHI flyer [PDF format] on your Department’s bulletin board with a billion virtual donuts. Or thereabouts.

As well as my eternal thanks, of course.

 

 



 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI)

 

TOCHI is the premier archival journal for contributions from the frontiers of human-computer interaction.

CHI is an exciting field, often with profound implications:

What are the human consequences of the technologies we create?

What are the impacts of user interfaces — and of the design choices we make — on people’s everyday lives?

How are technologies changing our society, and how can we use them to shape the many possible futures that are emerging as a result?

These questions, and many more, drive the vibrancy of the journal — and our field.

No Artificial Bounds. TOCHI embraces the full breadth of the diverse CHI community. We publish papers on any topic relevant to human-computer interaction, so long as the results offer significant new insights for the community. TOCHI particularly encourages integrative contributions that span multiple studies, multiple systems, or multiple explorations of a theme so as to contribute a new perspective to the field — the type of contribution that is nigh-impossible to convey in a typical conference paper.

Wisdom of the Elite. Papers go through rigorous peer review, led by a world-class editorial board stacked with leading experts. As one of our authors, you will benefit from their advice and deep insights to hone your research. Getting published in TOCHI represents a prestigious recognition of excellence.

Influence and Laurels. Acceptance at TOCHI garners an invitation to present your work at leading SIGCHI conferences. Combine the continuity of journal review — judicious and fair-minded, with an opportunity to redress critiques — with the lively discussion and influence that speaking at a top-notch conference brings. And starting in 2016, TOCHI will recognize our very best work with Best Paper Awards.

Rigorous and Fast. Although rigorous, TOCHI maintains a fast pace: decision time averages about 50 days. We publish accepted works quickly, online-first in the ACM Digital Library, and the pipeline from submission to publication can be shorter than the overwrought processes that tend to burden conference publication these days.

High Exposure. TOCHI heightens exposure for your research and enshrines the premier work in our field. And starting with Volume 23, the Editor-in-Chief will spotlight select articles, offering perspectives and reflections on some of the most intriguing contributions to grace our pages.

Submit your work today, and help advance the frontiers of technology — and the human experience.

>>>   Visit tochi.acm.org/authors to submit your manuscript

Editor-in-Chief:

Ken Hinckley, Microsoft Research, USA

 


Please see the PDF version of the flyer for a complete listing of the TOCHI Editorial Board, and other publication details.