Call for Papers: Special Issue on Human-Building Interaction

 

Call for Papers

Human-Building Interaction

A Special Issue of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ACM TOCHI)

Deadline for Submissions: (be sure to see also our author’s instructions)

  • December 8, 2017: Informal submission of abstract to special issue editors at HBI-TOCHI@unifr.ch.

Submission of an abstract is not required, but very strongly recommended for prospective special issue authors.

 

Information for Contributors

We seek original contributions for a new Special Issue of TOCHI on Human-Building Interaction.

Built environments increasingly incorporate interactivity and context-aware automation. Human-Building Interaction (HBI), as an emerging research field, seeks to develop an HCI lens to the vision of our interactive experiences with built environments.

A special issue of TOCHI on Human-Building Interaction invites research contributions that examine the engagement of HCI in the evolution of buildings and urban spaces.

In particular, we solicit articles that pursue the new coordinates that HCI should take into account when shifting attention and scale from “artefact” to “environment.” For example, the investigations on the occupant comfort across multiple dimensions (e.g., thermal, visual, acoustic, respiratory), the discussions of the interplay between user agency and building automation, the reflections on the immersive and durable user experience design, and so forth.

We seek contributions that address these and similar topics that embody the complexity of human’s individual and collective experiences with and within the built environment. The invited topics include technological innovations, ethnographic studies, as well as conceptual and framing contributions.

Between the lofty and mundane discourses of interactive architecture and connected products lies considerable space for grounded research and reflective discussion.

This special issue invites attempts to capture, share, and expand what is already known, what is contested, and what are opportunities for a common scientific grounding for prospective dialogues and discourses in the area of Human-Building Interaction. It will serve both as a unifying stage for the existing voices that are centrally and peripherally working on HBI, and a platform for the research area to move forward.

 

The HBI special issue is interested in questions including (but not limited to) the following:

  • How can HBI designers reconcile the complexity of human decisions with the efficiency that the automation systems promise? What services do we expect the building to provide seamlessly, and where do we want to retain the manipulation control, and through what interaction modalities?
  • What are the UX design challenges in creating buildings that can adapt to their occupants’ contextualized needs and preferences?
  • Surveillance is increasingly common to provide security. How does the need for surveillance interplay with the privacy concerns which are especially elevated in inhabited environments?
  • What can we learn from the comfort literature in the scholarly domain of architecture, and how can an HCI perspective complement and (possibly) correct the current comfort discourses?
  • In what ways can built environments support and take advantage of social and cultural diversity?
  • Are architecture and interaction design methods and processes compatible? Concretely, how can a team of interaction designers bring their tools to an architectural project?

Contact

Please direct inquiries regarding the special issue to HBI-TOCHI@unifr.ch.

 

Special Issue Editors:

  • Hamed Alavi (University of Fribourg and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL))
  • Elizabeth Churchill (Google, Mountain View)
  • Mikael Wiberg (Umea University)
  • Denis Lalanne (University of Fribourg)
  • Peter Dalsgaard (Aarhus University)
  • Ava Fatah gen Schieck (UCL, Bartlett School of Architecture)
  • Yvonne Rodgers (University College London & TOCHI Editorial Board)

Schedule and Submission Details

Pre-Submission Abstract Due: Dec 8, 2017 (email to HBI-TOCHI@unifr.ch).
Full Manuscript Submission deadline: Jan 12, 2018 (must submit to: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi).

The tentative reviewing timeline is as follows:

  • Reviews Due: March 30, 2018
  • First-round notifications to authors: April 15, 2018
  • First-round revisions due: June 15, 2018

Papers that pass the first round of reviewing will enter revisions and a second round of consideration:

  • Second-round reviews due: August 15, 2018
  • Second-round (final) author notifications: Sept 1, 2018
  • Final revisions Due: Oct 10, 2018

Special Issue Published: February 2019

 

All contributions will be rigorously peer reviewed to the usual exacting standards of TOCHI. Further information, including TOCHI submission procedures and advice on formatting and preparing manuscripts, can be found at: http://tochi.acm.org/authors/.

Manuscripts are submitted via the ACM online manuscript system at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi.

Please note that TOCHI remains open to regular submissions, as well, throughout the special issue call.

And We Award the Inaugural TOCHI Best Paper Award, 2016, to…

 


 

We interrupt your regularly scheduled blog posts for a special message from TOCHI’s Editor-in-Chief, Ken Hinckley, who shares with us some breaking news…


 

Banner for ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction Best Paper Award, 2016

And yesthank you, because indeed a very special moment in the history of the TOCHI journal has arrived, and herein we unveil the inaugural…

 

ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction

Best Paper Award

— 2016 —  

So sit back, grab some popcorn (and perhaps a beverage of your choosing), and enjoy the festivities.

 

With the Full Red Carpet Treatment. Of course, on such a celebratory occasion, we must roll out a luxuriant red promenade.

For a fleeting moment, we even considered a military parade for this inaugural occasion. But budgets being what they are, the best we could afford turned out to be a brigade of “Reviewer 2’s” armed with sharp red pens. To be brutally honest we feared this would not go over well, to say the least, and so all such plans were scrapped forthwith.

And with the reality of the publishing industry (as of early 2017) being what it is, our “red” carpet, I am afraid, must be printed solely in black and white.

Furthermore, rather than a plush walkway, the substrate upon which we must strut our stuff is much more akin to recycled newsprint.

But what a venue it is!

Okay, enough fun for now.

So let me set the stage for the award, and in so doing, switch to what my wife calls, my serious voice…


Because it takes incredibly hard work to get into TOCHI, and many notable HCI researchers have published their work in our pages. Even more important, I think, is the wave of up-and-comers in the field who are constantly breaking new ground. We are honored to have played a small role in building their careers, and publication credentials, as well.

TOCHI plays a vital role in the HCI community because it offers a forum for results that sprawl beyond the tidy boxes, tied up with neat satin bows, that can sometimes come to dominate typical conference papers. I’ve certainly written my fair share of those (only without the neatness, and often with some loose ends in those bows as well…). And of course there is nothing wrong with the “typical” conference-paper type of contribution, but by the same token it’s really important that the field has venues for results that are “out of the box” in a sense—and indeed, that span multiple boxes in the form of cross-discipline work, as well.

In that regard, the article we’ve selected for our 2016 Best Paper award is a great representative of the field. It reports on an interdisciplinary effort that advances the needs of a particular user community, but in so doing pushes on boundaries of interaction design and computer science as well. In order to build the system the authors embarked upon, the research had to upend some conventional wisdom regarding image navigation and innovate new interaction techniques along the way.

So (drum roll please), without further ado…

 

The recipient of the 2016 TOCHI Best Paper Award is:

 

The Design and Evaluation of

Interfaces for Navigating Gigapixel Images

in Digital Pathology

 

Roy A. Ruddle             School of Computing, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

Rhys G. Thomas          School of Computing, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

Rebecca Randell         School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, UK

Philip Quirke               Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, UK

Darren Treanor           St James’ University Hospital, Leeds, UK, and
Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, UK

 

ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction
Volume 23, No. 1, Article 5 (February 2015): 29 pages.
DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2834117

For this fine accomplishment, each of the authors will receive a physical manifestation of the award, which looks something like the following:

 Plaque for the inaugural TOCHI Best Paper Award, 2016

And just to pique your interest in this fine work just a bit further, the following abstract characterizes the work in the authors’ own words:

 This article describes the design and evaluation of two generations of an interface for navigating datasets of gigapixel images that pathologists use to diagnose cancer.

The interface design is innovative because users panned with an overview:detail view scale difference that was up to 57 times larger than established guidelines, and 1 million pixel “thumbnail” overviews that leveraged the real estate of high-resolution workstation displays.

The research involved experts performing real work (pathologists diagnosing cancer), using datasets that were up to 3,150 times larger than those used in previous studies that involved navigating images. The evaluation provides evidence about the effectiveness of the interfaces and characterizes how experts navigate gigapixel images when performing real work. Similar interfaces could be adopted in applications that use other types of high-resolution images (e.g., remote sensing or high-throughput microscopy).

Check it out. You’ll be glad you did. By the time you read this, the article should be available in the ACM Digital Library for open-access—sporting a spiffy new award badge no less—at:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2834117

Final Reminder: Re-imagining Participatory Design special issue deadline soon (Jan 2017!)

Our special issue on Re-imagining Participatory Design deadline is coming up very soon (we recommend sending your abstract to the special issue editors by Jan. 5 — see details at the link below.)

In case this opportunity has not yet caught your attention, here’s a little blurb for the special issue:

 

In recent years it seems Participatory Design has become synonymous with a more neutral form of ‘user-centered’ design, often merely aimed at a sort of token involvement of users in design, but in its deep roots—and hopefully in its re-imagined future to come—Participatory Design empowered intervention upon situations of conflict through developing more democratic processes.

Rather than a sort of corporate memo that has lost its verve by being xerox-copied one time too many in service of bland and generalized “information technology” needs, this Re-imagining encourages a return to Participatory Design’s vibrant roots in giving voice to oft-marginalized and under-represented classes of users.

With this perspective in mind, TOCHI extends an invitation for the community to think boldly about the future of participatory design.

To get involved, check out:

http://tochi.acm.org/re-imagining-participatory-design/

And we hope to see your submission in January 2017.

 

By |December 13th, 2016|Categories: 2017, Call for Papers, Special Issues|Tags: |0 Comments