I was impressed by the depth of thought and analysis that went into all of the contributions in this issue of TOCHI.

Three of the articles exceed fifty pages, often with rich illustrations, and through a concise and expertly paced presentation even the shortest article in this issue—a rare example of a TOCHI contribution that clocks in under 20 manuscript pages—packs a powerful punch:

 

People Do Not Feel Guilty About Exploiting Machines

With the recent defeat of the 18-time world Go champion at the hands of our would-be artificial overlords, I suppose not many people are feeling particularly guilty about the possibility of exploiting machines at the moment.

Yet well-established results show that people react to computers as social entities, and as such feelings of guilt and envy—and the extent to which they may or may not manifest themselves—have an important role to play in a compelling vision of the future where man and machine are not pitted against one another, but rather take on complementary roles that promise bring out the very best in human ability.

This article presents two provocative studies that show people experience similar levels of envy for humans as they do for machines in the context of three different economic games (the public goods, ultimatum, and dictator games)—yet people experience considerably less guilt vis-a-vis machines. The authors discuss the theoretic and practical implications of these findings for human-machine interaction systems that manifest cooperation, fairness, reciprocity, and other desirable properties of human-human interaction.

(http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2890495).