Without further ado, here is the second of the two articles in issue 23:2 of TOCHI that delves into the issues and challenges raised by mixed-reality spaces — again, from a unique perspective.

 

IN THE SPOTLIGHT, Part 2:

Accessible Play In Everyday Spaces: Mixed Reality Gaming For Adult Powered Wheelchair Users

One of the things that’s all too easy to forget in the excitement about location-sensing and ubiquitous computing is that the mobility of the user is taken for granted.

But for many individuals, simply getting around can be a huge challenge, and the continual status of diverse end-users as an afterthought in design is an unpleasant truth that requires all of us would-be interaction designers to take a very hard look in the mirror indeed.

Something most people don’t know about me is that my first wife died at the age of 29. For about the last six months of her life, she was largely confined to a wheelchair and needed oxygen everywhere she went. Yet she was vivacious and extremely bright, and had just finished her master’s degree. While I was on travel she went on a job interview. She arrived only to discover that from the lobby, a grand staircase led to her interviews on the second floor. The building was in an office park with no elevators.

I still remember vividly how she described that staircase, looming before her like an immense cliff.

Thus I was very happy to see this article run through the gauntlet of the rigorous TOCHI peer-review process and come out the other end as a wonderful contribution that is the first to address the social entertainment needs of adult powered chair users in a social and mobile game setting, namely a mixed reality implementation of capture-the-flag.

The article contains a number of perspectives and insights that really make one stop and take notice. For example, a strong theme that emerged was the desire not only for accessible entertainment, but also inclusive play with non-powered chair users, such as friends and family. The power of the activity to arouse the curiosity of bystanders and make them want to participate, as well, was also noted.

The purposeful moving-about engendered by the game was very freeing for the participants, but what perhaps most struck me in the entire article was a comment from the mother of one participant. While thrilled to see her daughter enjoying herself and engaging with others on this occasion, the mother reported that otherwise her daughter “mostly stays at home by herself.”

Perhaps this article can be the first small step towards righting this injustice.

The article concludes with an informative set of theoretically- and empirically-informed guidelines for includifying (or making inclusive) games originally designed for people without disabilities, through the use of technological augmentations such as mixed reality. And although there is obviously still a very long way to go in these directions, it was heartening to see some concrete progress in the form of this TOCHI contribution.

 

Katie Seaborn, Jamal Edey, Gregory Dolinar, Margot Whitfield, Paula Gardner, Carmen Branje, and Deborah Fels. 2016. Accessible Play in Everyday Spaces: Mixed Reality Gaming for Adult Powered Chair Users. ACM Trans. Comput.-Hum. Interact. 23, 2, Article 6 (April 2016), 28 pages.
DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2893182