Call for Papers: HCI and the Body: Reimagining Women’s Health

Call for Papers


HCI and the Body: Reimagining Women’s Health

A Special Issue of ACM Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction (ToCHI)

Deadline for Abstract Submissions: April 5th, 2019

In the HCI community we have seen an increasing exploration of technology in relation to the female body and women’s health. Much of this work had explored the role that technology can play in supporting transitions to, and experiences of motherhood. Such a focus reflects the wider approach of commercial technologies to the female body – that related to reproductive health. In the last five years research focus in relation to women’s health has broadened, entering into more intimate, taboo, and politically charged topics. This has included the design and evaluation of tools for enabling intimate anatomical knowledge, through to explorations of digital approaches to advocating for changes in policy relating to women’s health issues (from topics such as breastfeeding, parental leave through to abortion rights). These advances in the multiple experiences, voices and concerns of the female body and women’s health not only trouble the kinds of methods we have available for doing design and for evaluating our design work, but also define and redefine the limits of the technologies and interactions we create. So much of women’s health involves concern about parts of the body and topics which are normally highly personal, off-limits. The placement and uses of digital materials and technologies may be orientated or inserted in relation to the body in ways which the HCI community has rarely explored. Questions remain about how we as a community can best approach the body and women’s health in ways which are appropriate, inclusive, while also contributing to the improvement of women’s health experiences at a global level. We ask also how such new possibilities can be deployed, the risks of these deployments, as well as the means by which these interactions can be evaluated not just at an individual level, but also at the socio-cultural and political levels which are widely understood as constructing and limiting women’s health experiences.

Information for Contributors

This special issue aims to provide an inclusive perspective, acknowledging that biology alone does not dictate gender, and that the female experience is more than menstruation, pregnancy and motherhood. We wish to highlight the ways in which the digital intersects with the female experience, roadmap opportunities for digital technologies within women’s health, as well as provide critical and speculative perspectives on what technology means and could mean within this context.

Articles might contribute to this special issue in the following ways:

  • Scoping reviews and evaluations of existing women’s health technologies (including for example the self-sampling for HPV, menstrual tracking applications, technologies for sexual wellbeing, menopause awareness and management, etc.)
  • Ethnographies and/or interaction criticism that unpack women’s health experiences and digital re-presentations of the female body
  • Theoretical revisitations of the relationships between the body and digital technologies scoped to women’s health
  • Applications and designs (including critical and speculative) which respond to a full spectrum of women’s health experiences
  • Activism, advocacy and/or more general politics associated with worldwide access and experiences of women’s health
  • Design methods and processes which engage with, respond to, and reimagine the body in women’s health

We will use a standard journal review process for this special issue, with two rounds of reviews and revisions. Authors are encouraged to submit a short abstract (300-500 words) and a tentative title prior to the full paper submission to be reviewed by the special issue editors. In consultation with the journal managing editor, we will select a list of qualified reviewers for the special issue.

Further information, including TOCHI submission procedures and advice on formatting and preparing your manuscript, can be found at: http://www.acm.org/tochi/

Manuscripts are actually submitted via the ACM online manuscript system at:
http://acm.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi/

Deadline for Abstract Submissions: April 5th, 2019

To discuss a possible contribution, please contact the special issue editors at HCIhealth-editors@acm.org.

Special Issue Editors:


Madeline Balaam (KTH Royal Institute of Technology)
Shaowen Bardzell (Indiana University)
Lone Koefoed Hansen (University of Aarhus)
Teresa Almeida (IT University of Copenhagen).

Schedule and Plan for Special Issue


We will use a standard journal review process for this special issue, with two rounds of reviews and revisions. Authors are encouraged to submit a short abstract (300-500 words) and a tentative title prior to the full paper submission to be reviewed by the special issue editors. In consultation with the journal managing editor, we will select a list of qualified reviewers for the special issue.

The tentative reviewing timeline is as follows:

Abstract submission (300-500 words) deadline: April 5th, 2019
Feedback on abstract to authors (incl. Quick Reject): April 26th, 2019

For papers that pass the first round of review will be invited to submit a full paper, with the following tentative schedule:
Full paper submission deadline: June 14th, 2019
First-round reviews to authors: August 9th 2019
First-round revision deadline: Oct 11th 2019

2nd-round reviews to authors: Nov 8th 2019
Authors work on camera-ready copies and prepare for final submissions: By Nov 29th 2019

Publication is currently scheduled for March 2020.

By |February 13th, 2019|Categories: Call for Papers, Special Issues, Uncategorized|Tags: |0 Comments

ToCHI Best Paper Award 2017

ACM TOCHI is happy to announce the 2017 best paper award winner: “Motion Correlation: Selecting Objects by Matching their Movement” by authors Velloso, Carter, Newn, Esteves, Clarke and Gellersen.

Using eye gaze and gestures to interact with interfaces is gaining traction. Here we are shown important lessons learnt in how to design, implement and evaluate the use of eye gaze to select objects on a screen — be it a smartwatch screen, a large wall-mounted screen or selecting Internet of Things objects in our surroundings. The principle is to represent available objects by motion in the interface, have users identify a target by mimicking its specific motion, and use the correlation between the system’s output with the user’s input to determine the selection. The work is firmly based in a thorough understanding of human perception, explored in a range of different systems, arriving at a set of design principles and generalisable concepts.

https://doi.org/10.1145/3064937

By |February 5th, 2019|Categories: 2017, News, TOCHI Best Paper Award, Uncategorized|Tags: |0 Comments

TOCHI Mailing list and General Data Protection Regulation

Savvy TOCHI readers know that they can follow all our news & announcements by providing your contact information in the…

(drum roll please…)

“FOLLOW LATEST TOCHI NEWS” type in boxes.

Located oh so conveniently at the right side of our news feed page (https://tochi.acm.org/news/).

Now of course, if you are already a devoted fan of TOCHI, you signed up to the burgeoning TOCHI mailing list long ago.

And if not, then what are you waiting for?

Stay “on top of the top” journal in our field.

Yet per the new European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), we just wanted to remind you that–whether you just signed up now, or long ago–you have the right to ask for your contact information to be deleted from the mailing list at any time, and for any reason (including no reason at all).

We currently maintain our mailing list on MailChimp, and in the footer for each and every announcement (including this one), you should see instructions and links that direct you how to opt-out of the mailing list.

Please also feel free to email tochi@acm.org and ask for your name to be removed, if you like, and we will manually delete your name and contact information from our mailing list.

Thanks and we hope that your research, whatever form it takes, achieves great impact and enlightens the world far more than administrative notices of this sort (grin).

Sincerely,

Ken Hinckley

Your Friend and Humble Editor-in-Chief.

Call for Nominations: Editor-In-Chief ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction

The term of the current Editor-in-Chief (EiC) of the ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI) is coming to an end, and the ACM Publications Board has set up a nominating committee to assist the Board in selecting the next EiC.

Nominations, including self-nominations, are invited for a three-year term as TOCHI EiC, beginning on September 1, 2018. The EiC appointment may be renewed at most one time. This is an entirely voluntary position, but ACM will provide appropriate administrative support.

The EiC is responsible for maintaining the highest editorial quality, for setting technical direction of the papers published in TOCHI, and for maintaining a reasonable pipeline of articles for publication. He/she has final say on acceptance of papers, size of the Editorial Board, and appointment of Associate Editors. The EiC is expected to adhere to the commitments expressed in the policy on Rights and Responsibilities in ACM Publishing. For more information about the role of the EiC, see ACM’s Evaluation Criteria for Editors-in-Chief.

Nominations should include a vita along with a brief statement of why the nominee should be considered. Self-nominations are encouraged, and should include a statement of the candidate’s vision for the future development of TOCHI. The deadline for submitting nominations is July 1, 2018, although nominations will continue to be accepted until the position is filled.

Please send all nominations to the nominating committee chair, Cliff Lampe (cacl@umich.edu). The search committee members are:
• Cliff Lampe (University of Michigan), Chair
• Rob Jacobs (Tufts University)
• Caroline Appert (Université Paris-Sud)
• Darren Gergle (Northwestern University)
• Hrvoje Benko (Oculus Research)
• Holly Rushmeier (Yale University), ACM Pubs Board Liaison

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Human-Building Interaction

 

Call for Papers

Human-Building Interaction

A Special Issue of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ACM TOCHI)

Deadline for Submissions: (be sure to see also our author’s instructions)

  • December 8, 2017: Informal submission of abstract to special issue editors at HBI-TOCHI@unifr.ch.

Submission of an abstract is not required, but very strongly recommended for prospective special issue authors.

 

Information for Contributors

We seek original contributions for a new Special Issue of TOCHI on Human-Building Interaction.

Built environments increasingly incorporate interactivity and context-aware automation. Human-Building Interaction (HBI), as an emerging research field, seeks to develop an HCI lens to the vision of our interactive experiences with built environments.

A special issue of TOCHI on Human-Building Interaction invites research contributions that examine the engagement of HCI in the evolution of buildings and urban spaces.

In particular, we solicit articles that pursue the new coordinates that HCI should take into account when shifting attention and scale from “artefact” to “environment.” For example, the investigations on the occupant comfort across multiple dimensions (e.g., thermal, visual, acoustic, respiratory), the discussions of the interplay between user agency and building automation, the reflections on the immersive and durable user experience design, and so forth.

We seek contributions that address these and similar topics that embody the complexity of human’s individual and collective experiences with and within the built environment. The invited topics include technological innovations, ethnographic studies, as well as conceptual and framing contributions.

Between the lofty and mundane discourses of interactive architecture and connected products lies considerable space for grounded research and reflective discussion.

This special issue invites attempts to capture, share, and expand what is already known, what is contested, and what are opportunities for a common scientific grounding for prospective dialogues and discourses in the area of Human-Building Interaction. It will serve both as a unifying stage for the existing voices that are centrally and peripherally working on HBI, and a platform for the research area to move forward.

 

The HBI special issue is interested in questions including (but not limited to) the following:

  • How can HBI designers reconcile the complexity of human decisions with the efficiency that the automation systems promise? What services do we expect the building to provide seamlessly, and where do we want to retain the manipulation control, and through what interaction modalities?
  • What are the UX design challenges in creating buildings that can adapt to their occupants’ contextualized needs and preferences?
  • Surveillance is increasingly common to provide security. How does the need for surveillance interplay with the privacy concerns which are especially elevated in inhabited environments?
  • What can we learn from the comfort literature in the scholarly domain of architecture, and how can an HCI perspective complement and (possibly) correct the current comfort discourses?
  • In what ways can built environments support and take advantage of social and cultural diversity?
  • Are architecture and interaction design methods and processes compatible? Concretely, how can a team of interaction designers bring their tools to an architectural project?

Contact

Please direct inquiries regarding the special issue to HBI-TOCHI@unifr.ch.

 

Special Issue Editors:

  • Hamed Alavi (University of Fribourg and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL))
  • Elizabeth Churchill (Google, Mountain View)
  • Mikael Wiberg (Umea University)
  • Denis Lalanne (University of Fribourg)
  • Peter Dalsgaard (Aarhus University)
  • Ava Fatah gen Schieck (UCL, Bartlett School of Architecture)
  • Yvonne Rodgers (University College London & TOCHI Editorial Board)

Schedule and Submission Details

Pre-Submission Abstract Due: Dec 8, 2017 (email to HBI-TOCHI@unifr.ch).
Full Manuscript Submission deadline: Jan 12, 2018 (must submit to: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi).

The tentative reviewing timeline is as follows:

  • Reviews Due: March 30, 2018
  • First-round notifications to authors: April 15, 2018
  • First-round revisions due: June 15, 2018

Papers that pass the first round of reviewing will enter revisions and a second round of consideration:

  • Second-round reviews due: August 15, 2018
  • Second-round (final) author notifications: Sept 1, 2018
  • Final revisions Due: Oct 10, 2018

Special Issue Published: February 2019

 

All contributions will be rigorously peer reviewed to the usual exacting standards of TOCHI. Further information, including TOCHI submission procedures and advice on formatting and preparing manuscripts, can be found at: http://tochi.acm.org/authors/.

Manuscripts are submitted via the ACM online manuscript system at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi.

Please note that TOCHI remains open to regular submissions, as well, throughout the special issue call.

And We Award the Inaugural TOCHI Best Paper Award, 2016, to…

 


 

We interrupt your regularly scheduled blog posts for a special message from TOCHI’s Editor-in-Chief, Ken Hinckley, who shares with us some breaking news…


 

Banner for ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction Best Paper Award, 2016

And yesthank you, because indeed a very special moment in the history of the TOCHI journal has arrived, and herein we unveil the inaugural…

 

ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction

Best Paper Award

— 2016 —  

So sit back, grab some popcorn (and perhaps a beverage of your choosing), and enjoy the festivities.

 

With the Full Red Carpet Treatment. Of course, on such a celebratory occasion, we must roll out a luxuriant red promenade.

For a fleeting moment, we even considered a military parade for this inaugural occasion. But budgets being what they are, the best we could afford turned out to be a brigade of “Reviewer 2’s” armed with sharp red pens. To be brutally honest we feared this would not go over well, to say the least, and so all such plans were scrapped forthwith.

And with the reality of the publishing industry (as of early 2017) being what it is, our “red” carpet, I am afraid, must be printed solely in black and white.

Furthermore, rather than a plush walkway, the substrate upon which we must strut our stuff is much more akin to recycled newsprint.

But what a venue it is!

Okay, enough fun for now.

So let me set the stage for the award, and in so doing, switch to what my wife calls, my serious voice…


Because it takes incredibly hard work to get into TOCHI, and many notable HCI researchers have published their work in our pages. Even more important, I think, is the wave of up-and-comers in the field who are constantly breaking new ground. We are honored to have played a small role in building their careers, and publication credentials, as well.

TOCHI plays a vital role in the HCI community because it offers a forum for results that sprawl beyond the tidy boxes, tied up with neat satin bows, that can sometimes come to dominate typical conference papers. I’ve certainly written my fair share of those (only without the neatness, and often with some loose ends in those bows as well…). And of course there is nothing wrong with the “typical” conference-paper type of contribution, but by the same token it’s really important that the field has venues for results that are “out of the box” in a sense—and indeed, that span multiple boxes in the form of cross-discipline work, as well.

In that regard, the article we’ve selected for our 2016 Best Paper award is a great representative of the field. It reports on an interdisciplinary effort that advances the needs of a particular user community, but in so doing pushes on boundaries of interaction design and computer science as well. In order to build the system the authors embarked upon, the research had to upend some conventional wisdom regarding image navigation and innovate new interaction techniques along the way.

So (drum roll please), without further ado…

 

The recipient of the 2016 TOCHI Best Paper Award is:

 

The Design and Evaluation of

Interfaces for Navigating Gigapixel Images

in Digital Pathology

 

Roy A. Ruddle             School of Computing, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

Rhys G. Thomas          School of Computing, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

Rebecca Randell         School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, UK

Philip Quirke               Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, UK

Darren Treanor           St James’ University Hospital, Leeds, UK, and
Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, UK

 

ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction
Volume 23, No. 1, Article 5 (February 2015): 29 pages.
DOI= http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2834117

For this fine accomplishment, each of the authors will receive a physical manifestation of the award, which looks something like the following:

 Plaque for the inaugural TOCHI Best Paper Award, 2016

And just to pique your interest in this fine work just a bit further, the following abstract characterizes the work in the authors’ own words:

 This article describes the design and evaluation of two generations of an interface for navigating datasets of gigapixel images that pathologists use to diagnose cancer.

The interface design is innovative because users panned with an overview:detail view scale difference that was up to 57 times larger than established guidelines, and 1 million pixel “thumbnail” overviews that leveraged the real estate of high-resolution workstation displays.

The research involved experts performing real work (pathologists diagnosing cancer), using datasets that were up to 3,150 times larger than those used in previous studies that involved navigating images. The evaluation provides evidence about the effectiveness of the interfaces and characterizes how experts navigate gigapixel images when performing real work. Similar interfaces could be adopted in applications that use other types of high-resolution images (e.g., remote sensing or high-throughput microscopy).

Check it out. You’ll be glad you did. By the time you read this, the article should be available in the ACM Digital Library for open-access—sporting a spiffy new award badge no less—at:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2834117

TOCHI Article Alert: Fall Prevention for Older Adults: Qualitative Results from a Long-Term Field Study

Falls are one of the chief causes of serious injury among older adults, often ultimately resulting in reduced quality of life and a transition away from independent living.

This work deploys a sensing system with an interesting set of exergames aimed at early intervention through improved physical fitness and regular assessment of the risk of falls. While many challenges were encountered in deploying the system, and the user population was necessarily limited to relatively able-bodied individuals due to ethical and safety concerns, a six-month deployment with older adults in their homes as well as in community-dwelling situations showed great promise in empowering individuals to monitor and control their own fitness, health, and fall risk. Making this an enjoyable and entertaining activity that older adults can weave into their daily routines could be instrumental in effecting long-term use with sustainable health benefits.

(http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2967102).

TOCHI Article Alert: Applying the Norman 1986 User-Centered Model to Post-WIMP UIs

This work takes Norman’s classic notion of ‘cognitive engineering’ and updates it to the modern context of touch-based and tangible interfaces.

As the authors demonstrate for the particular case of a 3D object rotation task, Norman’s model still has a great deal of explanatory power for such a task and may continue to give insights into interaction methods and techniques that barely existed as research prototypes when his work was first conceived.

If indeed human beings think with their hands every bit as much (and perhaps even more so) than they do abstractly with reason, then perhaps in this era of the post-WIMP (Windows-Icons-Menus-Pointers) interface our tools for thought have come very far indeed.

(http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2983531).

TOCHI Article Alert: Investigating Expressive Tactile Interaction Design in Artistic Graphical Representations

This article is a wonderful example of something that unfortunately we don’t see come through our submissions queue as often as I would like: namely, a design-research-centric TOCHI contribution.

In particular, this article explores how tactile feedback can be employed in a multisensory context to augment works of visual art. Here, the focus is not on metrics such as bandwidth and speed-accuracy tradeoffs—as are traditional concerns in the use of tactile feedback to augment pointing devices (for example)—but rather largely unexplored questions of expressiveness and new interaction potentials rise to the fore. The result, in addition to a richly illustrated contribution, is a set of affordances for expressive visuotactile interactions, as well as an intriguing design space for tactile augmentation that points the way to new user experiences.

(http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2957756).

TOCHI Article Alert: HCI for Reconciling Everyday Food and Sustainability

This article is a moving example of how HCI has the potential to tackle some of the biggest problems facing the globe by framing these challenges as socio-technical design problems that must be met at the social, cultural, individual, and yes, technological levels.

At present most people’s food practices are mundane and often routine, but as particularly the ‘food pioneers’ probed by this study demonstrate, there are ample insights to be gained from existing practices that could inform the ‘user experience’ of obtaining and preparing sustainable food. And indeed, what ‘sustainable food’ itself entails is a complex interplay of ideas and concerns about what we eat and where it comes from. This is a complex design problem that encompasses everything from the in-store experience, packaging design, on-line shopping, social and family pressures, and awareness of the provenance of food, to name just a few issues unpacked by this far-ranging investigation.

(http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2970817).