About Ken Hinckley

Ken Hinckley is the Editor-in-Chief at ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI), and a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research. He writes here about news and emerging research published in the TOCHI journal; you can follow his own research on sensors, pen (and touch) computing, and many other topics at kenhinckley.wordpress.com.

Call for Papers: End User Development for the Internet of Things

A Special Issue of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (ACM TOCHI)

Deadline for Submissions: March 22, 2016 (see author’s instructions)

The advent of massively interconnected objects, devices, and sensors — commonly referred to as the Internet of Things — raises equally massive challenges regarding the interfaces that will allow end-users to manage the complexity of such systems and to exploit the opportunities such technologies open up.

A promising approach, known as End-User Development, empowers end users to define and tailor the functions of their systems in order to satisfy their personal, local, and often task-specific needs.

In the context of the Internet of Things, and the diverse tools and methodologies now available to support the design of interactive systems, the field of End-User Development finds itself at a critical juncture of growth and wide impact, as the need to support personal, context specific, and emergent needs largely exceeds what is known from more conventional interactive systems.

This special issue will publish compelling papers exploring metaphors, interfaces, and development strategies for supporting users in customization and personalization of the Internet of Things. Contributions may take the form of studies, methodologies, or system implementations that explore context-dependent or application-specific behaviors of networked objects. Likewise, contributions that reflect on or take issue with the appropriateness of End-User Development as a strategy to face these challenges are welcome.

Possible topics include:

  • Empowerment of end-users to understand, configure, personalize, and control Internet of Things applications
  • Design methods and approaches for end-users specific to the Internet of Things
  • Domain specific tools, architectures, and authoring environments for supporting end-user development
  • Contextual factors promoting end-user development practices
  • Social computing approaches for end-user development of Internet of Things ecologies
  • Novel methodologies for evaluating emerging end-user interactions with the Internet of Things

 

Deadline

Final manuscripts are due March 22, 2016, but earlier submissions are encouraged.

Contact

To discuss a possible contribution please contact the special issue editors at eud-for-iot@tochi.acm.org.

 

Special Issue Editors:

  • Panos Markopoulos (Eindhoven University of Technology)
  • Jeffrey Nichols (Google)
  • Fabio Paternò (CNR-ISTI)
  • Volkmar Pipek (University of Siegen)
  • For questions, please contact eud-for-iot@tochi.acm.org.

Schedule and Submission Details

Submissions deadline: March 22, 2016
Reviews Due: May 22, 2016
Author Notification: June 22, 2016
Revised Papers Due: August 22, 2016
Special Issue Published: Late 2016 (estimated)

 

All contributions will be rigorously peer reviewed to the usual exacting standards of TOCHI. Further information, including TOCHI submission procedures and advice on formatting and preparing manuscripts, can be found at: http://tochi.acm.org/authors/.

Manuscripts are submitted via the ACM online manuscript system at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tochi.

This is an abridged version of the call for publicity purposes. See http://tochi.acm.org/end-user-development-for-the-internet-of-things/ for further framing of the topic and additional questions and issues raised by this exciting confluence of two key areas.

 

Farewell from Shumin Zhai, Welcome Ken Hinckley

Shumin Zhai’s farewell editorial is now live in the ACM Digital Library.

As our departing Editor-in-Chief, he reports on the remarkable improvements he effected for the TOCHI journal’s operation, including a much brisker pace of handling submissions (now averaging less than 50 days).

He also initiated electronic-first publication of accepted TOCHI papers, which greatly reduces the end-to-end pipeline for our authors to reveal their exciting new results to the world.

Under Shumin’s leadership there were also tremendous strides in enhancing the journal’s impact, such as inviting authors of accepted papers to speak at CHI and other leading SIGCHI conferences. He grew the journal from 4 issues per year to 6, and doubled the amount of content TOCHI publishes overall — all while maintaining the journal’s reputation for a fair and rigorous review cycle. His efforts have pushed key metrics, such as downloads per article, into to the upper echelon of ACM Transactions-level journals.

The net results of all these initiatives have further elevated TOCHI’s stature as the flagship journal of the Computer-Human Interaction community.

But with his six years of service at an end, and his maximum allowable two terms as Editor-in-chief completed with distinction, he now receives the greatest award of all:

Shumin gets his life back (grin).

And so the ACM Publications Board, with Shumin’s enthusiastic support, has appointed his successor:

Ken Hinckley, a long-time associate editor for TOCHI and a leading researcher in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI), becomes the journal’s fifth Editor-in-Chief.

Ken is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, and also a member of the CHI Academy. He has served as Technical Program Chair for CHI, papers chair for UIST and MobileHCI, and on the editorial boards of other leading journals such as the HCI Journal.

He is perhaps best known for his work on mobile sensing, pen (and touch) interaction, and interaction techniques that combine multiple modalities (and sensors) in new ways. You can learn more about him, and follow his work, from his research blog.

But Ken also prides himself on being a generalist, both in terms of topic and research approach, and in recent months nothing excites him more than finding a promising TOCHI submission that has just come in over the transom. He hopes to find one of yours there soon.

So be sure to check out Shumin’s closing remarks — words of wisdom as always — and the next issue of TOCHI (Volume 23, Issue 1) will feature Ken’s introductory editorial discussing where things stand for TOCHI as well as some new initiatives in the works.

But rest assured that the new editorial team has redoubled the journal’s commitment to timely and professional responses, with a never-ending attention to thoughtful and rigorous reviews.

We fully intend to build on and hopefully expand even futher the great successes and impact that Shumin paved the way for when he firmly took the reins of TOCHI in his able hands.

Ken Hinckley
Editor-in-Chief